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      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

      05/24/2015, 12:00am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

       

      In the heat of a game, it’s easy to lose our cool. Just ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. In the midst of a sweep of the Boston Celtics in the first round of the NBA playoffs, with the series well in hand, J.R. Smith committed a flagrant foul that resulted in his immediate ejection and a two-game suspension. Losing his cool may very well cost his team, as the Cavs are already hampered due to an injury to another starter, Kevin Love.

      Maintaining self-control in the face of challenges, adversity and disappointment is one of the great life lessons that sports can uniquely teach our kids. And while we’d all like to hope that our kids just ‘know what to do’ when the moment presents itself, a little coaching and some clever tips can go a long way toward giving your kids the tools they need to keep their cool in sports and in life.

      So this month, the team at Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive, along with the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance, prepared a six-step approach and companion exercise to help teach your athletes how to keep their cool in frustrating moments.

      Take A Break. 
      When you’re feeling upset and frustrated, sometimes we all just need a quick break to re-center ourselves. Call time-out. Sub out for a play and take a deep breath on the bench.

      Name That Tune. 
      Sometimes it takes recognizing and naming a feeling to then be able to cool down. Encourage kids to notice how their body is feeling to recognize and name the emotions that accompany those feelings, and then to be able to say, “I feel….”. “Is your face red? Are your hands clenched? Are your shoulders tense? Okay – that sounds like you might feel ‘mad’.”

      Count to 10. 
      Having recognized and named an emotion (“mad!”), they can start to recover, maybe counting to ten – “ten Mississippi” if a bit more time is needed – to help the body slow down and give the brain a chance to process and think.

      What Are My Options? 
      Help your athletes take a minute to think through the options for dealing with the emotion. Yell and scream? Kick dirt? Walk away? Tell the other athlete – in nice words – why you are angry? Brush it off and move on to the next play? Help your children think through all of the potential options, and then give them the chance to pick what they think is the best option.

      Try this exercise in practice or at home: write a scenario at the top of the page, “An opposing player just committed a dirty foul on me!” and then split the page into two columns, one labelled Good Options, the other labelled Bad Options. Then have your athletes write down all of the possible actions they could take and place each action under either Good or Bad. (You can do this exercise as a team with players providing answers together and deciding whether each should go under Good or Bad.) Once all the possible choices are listed, circle the best choice and discuss why it is the best. (This page can turn into a poster that may be a great addition to the locker room for the season, reminding kids that there are lots of options but that as a team you’re striving for the best option and the one that maintains self-control and good sportsmanship.)

      Act Out The Best Choice. 
      Step five is to practice acting on the best choice from the Good Options you selected in step 4; don’t just think it in your head. This suggestion may seem more like drama class than sports practice, but act out the best-choice emotion. Think improv: how can you demonstrate and show the emotion if you had no words? It might feel like you’re over the top, but by being overly effusive with emotions in this acting, your athletes cement the ‘best choice’ in their minds, their emotions and their body language.

      Next! 
      Get focused on the next play, the next pitch, the next side change, the next round. Some teams use visual cues like a “brush it off” sign or a “flush it” hand gesture to remind everyone to let it go, reset, refocus and get back into the game.

      Keeping your cool can be tough, especially when the contest isn’t going your way, the fouls aren’t being called, the scoreboard doesn’t reflect your effort, or when a cheap shot disrupts your concentration and flow. But athletes who learn how to stay calm, focused, and ready for what’s next are more likely to stay mentally and physically in the game and give their teams the best chance to win – on and off the field.

      Develop Your Mental Edge Of the Game

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

       

      Key Points In Your Mental Game

      By: Frank Scarpaci 
      Sent to: all access groups (excl. public).

      Encourage Young Athletes to Prepare for the Unexpected 

      Youth Sports Prepare for the Unexpected 
      In sports, there is one given - expect the unexpected.

      As fans, this excitement of not knowing what will happen next is a big reason why we attend, watch and talk about sporting events. For athletes, the unexpected, while thrilling, demands proper preparation to be successful.

      From in-season practices to offseason cross-training, preparation helps our youth athletes build a rock-solid foundation for game-day success. It’s what they do to get ready for competition that often makes the difference when the unexpected happens.

      But how can you help your youth athletes prepare for the unexpected? How can you convince them of the power of preparation?

      Liberty Mutual Insurance, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, offers the following helpful tips and tactics for preparing for the unexpected.

      Envision only success. Encourage them to visualize a stress-free, successful performance – no matter what scenario unfolds. By “practicing” visualization, meditation and other mental training techniques, they’ll give their minds a powerful pre-game “workout.”

      All-out effort. There are many parts of the game they can’t control, but they can control their effort and attitude. Remind them that win or lose, what is more important is whether t they gave 100% effort!

      Keep at it. Tell them the mind is a muscle. Like any muscle, it has to be exercised to grow strong. And like any other part of their game, the more they work their mind, the stronger it gets, making it easier for them to adjust and adapt on the fly.

      Switch it up. Just like your children can “cross-train” by playing multiple sports, they can vary and “change up” their practice routine. They can try practicing with different equipment, or work on using their “off hand”. They can also prepare for different roles, such as a reserve player training to take on a starter’s responsibilities.

      Situational learning. Encourage your kids to practice in different, even difficult, conditions and situations. Practicing in different conditions will help them adapt to a tough game day environment, challenge their normal routine, and demand game-like focus. Activities like simulating crowd noise with a sound system will force them to focus and “zone in” on performing their best.

      With these simple tips from Liberty Mutual Insurance, we hope that your child can always stay prepared for the unexpected.

       

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

       

      Low-Stress Success 
       

      Many parents get their children involved in youth sports so they can have fun. But a good time can quickly turn into a bad one when pressure on youth athletes causes them to feel stress.

      Sometimes the stress comes from the outside when children feel like their parents or coaches expect a win. Other times, pressure can be internal, brought on by the athletes themselves. This can cause fear and anxiety, negatively affecting your child before, during and after competition. 

      Fear of failure is one of the most prevalent stressors in sports. Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ and our partner Positive Coaching Alliance encourage you to remind your child that the game is about more than just winning. Supporting your children and doing all you can to avoid instilling negative thoughts or emotions lets them focus on striving to play well. Using the simple phrases below before a game will help:

      “I love you” “Play hard” “Have fun”

      After some time, stressed athletes can become resentful or decide to quit playing their sport entirely to avoid these negative feelings.

      It’s important for your youth athlete to find ways to de-stress, calm down or “zone in” on their own before, during and after a game. This will help avoid a sense of negative pressure and funnel that energy positively toward their performance. 

      A non-attachment approach is a way youth athletes can learn to perform their best when it matters most. Non-attachment is having the ability to detach yourself from the outcome of a performance and just focus on executing during competition. Youth athletes must learn to define themselves by more than just the results of the game. This can be reinforced after the game when you have the chance to talk to your athletes about their performances.

      Making comments such as: “I love watching you play!” or “You looked like you were having so much fun out there!” will remind your child that the game isn’t all about winning or losing. 

      At home you can help your children relieve some of their stress by making sure they are managing their time well and getting enough rest. Both are key elements in a healthy low-stress lifestyle.

      When children learn to enjoy sports for their own sake, and their goal becomes to do their best rather than trying to be the best, they will find it easier to overcome stress before, during and after the game.

       

      Dear Eels Family and Friends,

       

      Michelle Jumalon’s dad and Steven’s grandfather, Larry Clapp passed away yesterday morning after a tough fight with Cancer. He was an honored veteran who served his country proudly. Many of you helped the family in support and prayer to have him medically transported back to Florida so he could spend his last few days with the family. I can tell you it was most appreciated. The time was so short but the quality and moments they got to spend together in his last days was so special.

       

      Like always the Florida Eels families and friends find it in our hearts to step up to the podium and come through for those in need. Thank you once again for your generosity and fellowship.

       

       We will let you know when the family plans to hold the memorial service.

       

      Please join me in prayer as these are difficult times for Michelle, her mom, her family and especially young Steven. It is never easy to loose a loved one. It is even more difficult to loose a person who was so special, loving and dear to their heart.

       

      Love Coach Frank

      Eels Peewee Spring Team Wins FAHL Title

      05/21/2015, 10:30am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Very Proud Of this team

      Well The Eels Peewees Win The FAHL Spring League Championship Title. Win 4 straight sweeping the Playoffs.

       

      The Peewee Spring players came together this April and we had no idea how they would do. Well with 8 new additions to the team and with players from our house rec program many doubted our resolve. But the team would not hear of defeat.  With the intense training from coach Frankie and Coach Frank we all set the train in motion. We stressed hockey intelligence and knowing the game. Not just positioning but knowing the game. Coach Frankie really stepped up with the players teaching so much on and off the ice.

       

      This locomotive did not stop until we won the league championship. Boy oh boy was this was an exciting weekend as well.  We swept all 4 teams and clearly were one or 2 steps ahead of everyone. The passing was there, the skating a bit ahead, the breakouts on the dime and power play and penalty kill was like clock work. The boys out shot the completion by an average of 50 shots a game and in one game we unloaded 78 shots.

       

      More than any anything did they have fun. It was all over their faces. The kids had more fun than ever before. So didn’t coach Frank. I had a blast with these guys. It illustrates player development no doubt. They all learned to play and perform so much better. We gave them the room to grow.

       

      I will say I don’t know of any peewee team in the state that could beat us. We played a very balance defense, our back check was relentless and we forced turnovers every time the opposition had the puck with our tenacious fore-check. Our scoring was very balanced and our goaltending very strong

      Way to bring home a championship to the Skatium

       

      Coach Frank

      More News

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

      05/24/2015, 12:00am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

       

      In the heat of a game, it’s easy to lose our cool. Just ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. In the midst of a sweep of the Boston Celtics in the first round of the NBA playoffs, with the series well in hand, J.R. Smith committed a flagrant foul that resulted in his immediate ejection and a two-game suspension. Losing his cool may very well cost his team, as the Cavs are already hampered due to an injury to another starter, Kevin Love.

      Maintaining self-control in the face of challenges, adversity and disappointment is one of the great life lessons that sports can uniquely teach our kids. And while we’d all like to hope that our kids just ‘know what to do’ when the moment presents itself, a little coaching and some clever tips can go a long way toward giving your kids the tools they need to keep their cool in sports and in life.

      So this month, the team at Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive, along with the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance, prepared a six-step approach and companion exercise to help teach your athletes how to keep their cool in frustrating moments.

      Take A Break. 
      When you’re feeling upset and frustrated, sometimes we all just need a quick break to re-center ourselves. Call time-out. Sub out for a play and take a deep breath on the bench.

      Name That Tune. 
      Sometimes it takes recognizing and naming a feeling to then be able to cool down. Encourage kids to notice how their body is feeling to recognize and name the emotions that accompany those feelings, and then to be able to say, “I feel….”. “Is your face red? Are your hands clenched? Are your shoulders tense? Okay – that sounds like you might feel ‘mad’.”

      Count to 10. 
      Having recognized and named an emotion (“mad!”), they can start to recover, maybe counting to ten – “ten Mississippi” if a bit more time is needed – to help the body slow down and give the brain a chance to process and think.

      What Are My Options? 
      Help your athletes take a minute to think through the options for dealing with the emotion. Yell and scream? Kick dirt? Walk away? Tell the other athlete – in nice words – why you are angry? Brush it off and move on to the next play? Help your children think through all of the potential options, and then give them the chance to pick what they think is the best option.

      Try this exercise in practice or at home: write a scenario at the top of the page, “An opposing player just committed a dirty foul on me!” and then split the page into two columns, one labelled Good Options, the other labelled Bad Options. Then have your athletes write down all of the possible actions they could take and place each action under either Good or Bad. (You can do this exercise as a team with players providing answers together and deciding whether each should go under Good or Bad.) Once all the possible choices are listed, circle the best choice and discuss why it is the best. (This page can turn into a poster that may be a great addition to the locker room for the season, reminding kids that there are lots of options but that as a team you’re striving for the best option and the one that maintains self-control and good sportsmanship.)

      Act Out The Best Choice. 
      Step five is to practice acting on the best choice from the Good Options you selected in step 4; don’t just think it in your head. This suggestion may seem more like drama class than sports practice, but act out the best-choice emotion. Think improv: how can you demonstrate and show the emotion if you had no words? It might feel like you’re over the top, but by being overly effusive with emotions in this acting, your athletes cement the ‘best choice’ in their minds, their emotions and their body language.

      Next! 
      Get focused on the next play, the next pitch, the next side change, the next round. Some teams use visual cues like a “brush it off” sign or a “flush it” hand gesture to remind everyone to let it go, reset, refocus and get back into the game.

      Keeping your cool can be tough, especially when the contest isn’t going your way, the fouls aren’t being called, the scoreboard doesn’t reflect your effort, or when a cheap shot disrupts your concentration and flow. But athletes who learn how to stay calm, focused, and ready for what’s next are more likely to stay mentally and physically in the game and give their teams the best chance to win – on and off the field.

      Develop Your Mental Edge Of the Game

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

       

      Key Points In Your Mental Game

      By: Frank Scarpaci 
      Sent to: all access groups (excl. public).

      Encourage Young Athletes to Prepare for the Unexpected 

      Youth Sports Prepare for the Unexpected 
      In sports, there is one given - expect the unexpected.

      As fans, this excitement of not knowing what will happen next is a big reason why we attend, watch and talk about sporting events. For athletes, the unexpected, while thrilling, demands proper preparation to be successful.

      From in-season practices to offseason cross-training, preparation helps our youth athletes build a rock-solid foundation for game-day success. It’s what they do to get ready for competition that often makes the difference when the unexpected happens.

      But how can you help your youth athletes prepare for the unexpected? How can you convince them of the power of preparation?

      Liberty Mutual Insurance, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, offers the following helpful tips and tactics for preparing for the unexpected.

      Envision only success. Encourage them to visualize a stress-free, successful performance – no matter what scenario unfolds. By “practicing” visualization, meditation and other mental training techniques, they’ll give their minds a powerful pre-game “workout.”

      All-out effort. There are many parts of the game they can’t control, but they can control their effort and attitude. Remind them that win or lose, what is more important is whether t they gave 100% effort!

      Keep at it. Tell them the mind is a muscle. Like any muscle, it has to be exercised to grow strong. And like any other part of their game, the more they work their mind, the stronger it gets, making it easier for them to adjust and adapt on the fly.

      Switch it up. Just like your children can “cross-train” by playing multiple sports, they can vary and “change up” their practice routine. They can try practicing with different equipment, or work on using their “off hand”. They can also prepare for different roles, such as a reserve player training to take on a starter’s responsibilities.

      Situational learning. Encourage your kids to practice in different, even difficult, conditions and situations. Practicing in different conditions will help them adapt to a tough game day environment, challenge their normal routine, and demand game-like focus. Activities like simulating crowd noise with a sound system will force them to focus and “zone in” on performing their best.

      With these simple tips from Liberty Mutual Insurance, we hope that your child can always stay prepared for the unexpected.

       

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

       

      Low-Stress Success 
       

      Many parents get their children involved in youth sports so they can have fun. But a good time can quickly turn into a bad one when pressure on youth athletes causes them to feel stress.

      Sometimes the stress comes from the outside when children feel like their parents or coaches expect a win. Other times, pressure can be internal, brought on by the athletes themselves. This can cause fear and anxiety, negatively affecting your child before, during and after competition. 

      Fear of failure is one of the most prevalent stressors in sports. Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ and our partner Positive Coaching Alliance encourage you to remind your child that the game is about more than just winning. Supporting your children and doing all you can to avoid instilling negative thoughts or emotions lets them focus on striving to play well. Using the simple phrases below before a game will help:

      “I love you” “Play hard” “Have fun”

      After some time, stressed athletes can become resentful or decide to quit playing their sport entirely to avoid these negative feelings.

      It’s important for your youth athlete to find ways to de-stress, calm down or “zone in” on their own before, during and after a game. This will help avoid a sense of negative pressure and funnel that energy positively toward their performance. 

      A non-attachment approach is a way youth athletes can learn to perform their best when it matters most. Non-attachment is having the ability to detach yourself from the outcome of a performance and just focus on executing during competition. Youth athletes must learn to define themselves by more than just the results of the game. This can be reinforced after the game when you have the chance to talk to your athletes about their performances.

      Making comments such as: “I love watching you play!” or “You looked like you were having so much fun out there!” will remind your child that the game isn’t all about winning or losing. 

      At home you can help your children relieve some of their stress by making sure they are managing their time well and getting enough rest. Both are key elements in a healthy low-stress lifestyle.

      When children learn to enjoy sports for their own sake, and their goal becomes to do their best rather than trying to be the best, they will find it easier to overcome stress before, during and after the game.

       

      Dear Eels Family and Friends,

       

      Michelle Jumalon’s dad and Steven’s grandfather, Larry Clapp passed away yesterday morning after a tough fight with Cancer. He was an honored veteran who served his country proudly. Many of you helped the family in support and prayer to have him medically transported back to Florida so he could spend his last few days with the family. I can tell you it was most appreciated. The time was so short but the quality and moments they got to spend together in his last days was so special.

       

      Like always the Florida Eels families and friends find it in our hearts to step up to the podium and come through for those in need. Thank you once again for your generosity and fellowship.

       

       We will let you know when the family plans to hold the memorial service.

       

      Please join me in prayer as these are difficult times for Michelle, her mom, her family and especially young Steven. It is never easy to loose a loved one. It is even more difficult to loose a person who was so special, loving and dear to their heart.

       

      Love Coach Frank

      Eels Peewee Spring Team Wins FAHL Title

      05/21/2015, 10:30am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Very Proud Of this team

      Well The Eels Peewees Win The FAHL Spring League Championship Title. Win 4 straight sweeping the Playoffs.

       

      The Peewee Spring players came together this April and we had no idea how they would do. Well with 8 new additions to the team and with players from our house rec program many doubted our resolve. But the team would not hear of defeat.  With the intense training from coach Frankie and Coach Frank we all set the train in motion. We stressed hockey intelligence and knowing the game. Not just positioning but knowing the game. Coach Frankie really stepped up with the players teaching so much on and off the ice.

       

      This locomotive did not stop until we won the league championship. Boy oh boy was this was an exciting weekend as well.  We swept all 4 teams and clearly were one or 2 steps ahead of everyone. The passing was there, the skating a bit ahead, the breakouts on the dime and power play and penalty kill was like clock work. The boys out shot the completion by an average of 50 shots a game and in one game we unloaded 78 shots.

       

      More than any anything did they have fun. It was all over their faces. The kids had more fun than ever before. So didn’t coach Frank. I had a blast with these guys. It illustrates player development no doubt. They all learned to play and perform so much better. We gave them the room to grow.

       

      I will say I don’t know of any peewee team in the state that could beat us. We played a very balance defense, our back check was relentless and we forced turnovers every time the opposition had the puck with our tenacious fore-check. Our scoring was very balanced and our goaltending very strong

      Way to bring home a championship to the Skatium

       

      Coach Frank

      More News

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

      05/24/2015, 12:00am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

       

      In the heat of a game, it’s easy to lose our cool. Just ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. In the midst of a sweep of the Boston Celtics in the first round of the NBA playoffs, with the series well in hand, J.R. Smith committed a flagrant foul that resulted in his immediate ejection and a two-game suspension. Losing his cool may very well cost his team, as the Cavs are already hampered due to an injury to another starter, Kevin Love.

      Maintaining self-control in the face of challenges, adversity and disappointment is one of the great life lessons that sports can uniquely teach our kids. And while we’d all like to hope that our kids just ‘know what to do’ when the moment presents itself, a little coaching and some clever tips can go a long way toward giving your kids the tools they need to keep their cool in sports and in life.

      So this month, the team at Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive, along with the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance, prepared a six-step approach and companion exercise to help teach your athletes how to keep their cool in frustrating moments.

      Take A Break. 
      When you’re feeling upset and frustrated, sometimes we all just need a quick break to re-center ourselves. Call time-out. Sub out for a play and take a deep breath on the bench.

      Name That Tune. 
      Sometimes it takes recognizing and naming a feeling to then be able to cool down. Encourage kids to notice how their body is feeling to recognize and name the emotions that accompany those feelings, and then to be able to say, “I feel….”. “Is your face red? Are your hands clenched? Are your shoulders tense? Okay – that sounds like you might feel ‘mad’.”

      Count to 10. 
      Having recognized and named an emotion (“mad!”), they can start to recover, maybe counting to ten – “ten Mississippi” if a bit more time is needed – to help the body slow down and give the brain a chance to process and think.

      What Are My Options? 
      Help your athletes take a minute to think through the options for dealing with the emotion. Yell and scream? Kick dirt? Walk away? Tell the other athlete – in nice words – why you are angry? Brush it off and move on to the next play? Help your children think through all of the potential options, and then give them the chance to pick what they think is the best option.

      Try this exercise in practice or at home: write a scenario at the top of the page, “An opposing player just committed a dirty foul on me!” and then split the page into two columns, one labelled Good Options, the other labelled Bad Options. Then have your athletes write down all of the possible actions they could take and place each action under either Good or Bad. (You can do this exercise as a team with players providing answers together and deciding whether each should go under Good or Bad.) Once all the possible choices are listed, circle the best choice and discuss why it is the best. (This page can turn into a poster that may be a great addition to the locker room for the season, reminding kids that there are lots of options but that as a team you’re striving for the best option and the one that maintains self-control and good sportsmanship.)

      Act Out The Best Choice. 
      Step five is to practice acting on the best choice from the Good Options you selected in step 4; don’t just think it in your head. This suggestion may seem more like drama class than sports practice, but act out the best-choice emotion. Think improv: how can you demonstrate and show the emotion if you had no words? It might feel like you’re over the top, but by being overly effusive with emotions in this acting, your athletes cement the ‘best choice’ in their minds, their emotions and their body language.

      Next! 
      Get focused on the next play, the next pitch, the next side change, the next round. Some teams use visual cues like a “brush it off” sign or a “flush it” hand gesture to remind everyone to let it go, reset, refocus and get back into the game.

      Keeping your cool can be tough, especially when the contest isn’t going your way, the fouls aren’t being called, the scoreboard doesn’t reflect your effort, or when a cheap shot disrupts your concentration and flow. But athletes who learn how to stay calm, focused, and ready for what’s next are more likely to stay mentally and physically in the game and give their teams the best chance to win – on and off the field.

      Develop Your Mental Edge Of the Game

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

       

      Key Points In Your Mental Game

      By: Frank Scarpaci 
      Sent to: all access groups (excl. public).

      Encourage Young Athletes to Prepare for the Unexpected 

      Youth Sports Prepare for the Unexpected 
      In sports, there is one given - expect the unexpected.

      As fans, this excitement of not knowing what will happen next is a big reason why we attend, watch and talk about sporting events. For athletes, the unexpected, while thrilling, demands proper preparation to be successful.

      From in-season practices to offseason cross-training, preparation helps our youth athletes build a rock-solid foundation for game-day success. It’s what they do to get ready for competition that often makes the difference when the unexpected happens.

      But how can you help your youth athletes prepare for the unexpected? How can you convince them of the power of preparation?

      Liberty Mutual Insurance, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, offers the following helpful tips and tactics for preparing for the unexpected.

      Envision only success. Encourage them to visualize a stress-free, successful performance – no matter what scenario unfolds. By “practicing” visualization, meditation and other mental training techniques, they’ll give their minds a powerful pre-game “workout.”

      All-out effort. There are many parts of the game they can’t control, but they can control their effort and attitude. Remind them that win or lose, what is more important is whether t they gave 100% effort!

      Keep at it. Tell them the mind is a muscle. Like any muscle, it has to be exercised to grow strong. And like any other part of their game, the more they work their mind, the stronger it gets, making it easier for them to adjust and adapt on the fly.

      Switch it up. Just like your children can “cross-train” by playing multiple sports, they can vary and “change up” their practice routine. They can try practicing with different equipment, or work on using their “off hand”. They can also prepare for different roles, such as a reserve player training to take on a starter’s responsibilities.

      Situational learning. Encourage your kids to practice in different, even difficult, conditions and situations. Practicing in different conditions will help them adapt to a tough game day environment, challenge their normal routine, and demand game-like focus. Activities like simulating crowd noise with a sound system will force them to focus and “zone in” on performing their best.

      With these simple tips from Liberty Mutual Insurance, we hope that your child can always stay prepared for the unexpected.

       

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

       

      Low-Stress Success 
       

      Many parents get their children involved in youth sports so they can have fun. But a good time can quickly turn into a bad one when pressure on youth athletes causes them to feel stress.

      Sometimes the stress comes from the outside when children feel like their parents or coaches expect a win. Other times, pressure can be internal, brought on by the athletes themselves. This can cause fear and anxiety, negatively affecting your child before, during and after competition. 

      Fear of failure is one of the most prevalent stressors in sports. Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ and our partner Positive Coaching Alliance encourage you to remind your child that the game is about more than just winning. Supporting your children and doing all you can to avoid instilling negative thoughts or emotions lets them focus on striving to play well. Using the simple phrases below before a game will help:

      “I love you” “Play hard” “Have fun”

      After some time, stressed athletes can become resentful or decide to quit playing their sport entirely to avoid these negative feelings.

      It’s important for your youth athlete to find ways to de-stress, calm down or “zone in” on their own before, during and after a game. This will help avoid a sense of negative pressure and funnel that energy positively toward their performance. 

      A non-attachment approach is a way youth athletes can learn to perform their best when it matters most. Non-attachment is having the ability to detach yourself from the outcome of a performance and just focus on executing during competition. Youth athletes must learn to define themselves by more than just the results of the game. This can be reinforced after the game when you have the chance to talk to your athletes about their performances.

      Making comments such as: “I love watching you play!” or “You looked like you were having so much fun out there!” will remind your child that the game isn’t all about winning or losing. 

      At home you can help your children relieve some of their stress by making sure they are managing their time well and getting enough rest. Both are key elements in a healthy low-stress lifestyle.

      When children learn to enjoy sports for their own sake, and their goal becomes to do their best rather than trying to be the best, they will find it easier to overcome stress before, during and after the game.

       

      Dear Eels Family and Friends,

       

      Michelle Jumalon’s dad and Steven’s grandfather, Larry Clapp passed away yesterday morning after a tough fight with Cancer. He was an honored veteran who served his country proudly. Many of you helped the family in support and prayer to have him medically transported back to Florida so he could spend his last few days with the family. I can tell you it was most appreciated. The time was so short but the quality and moments they got to spend together in his last days was so special.

       

      Like always the Florida Eels families and friends find it in our hearts to step up to the podium and come through for those in need. Thank you once again for your generosity and fellowship.

       

       We will let you know when the family plans to hold the memorial service.

       

      Please join me in prayer as these are difficult times for Michelle, her mom, her family and especially young Steven. It is never easy to loose a loved one. It is even more difficult to loose a person who was so special, loving and dear to their heart.

       

      Love Coach Frank

      Eels Peewee Spring Team Wins FAHL Title

      05/21/2015, 10:30am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Very Proud Of this team

      Well The Eels Peewees Win The FAHL Spring League Championship Title. Win 4 straight sweeping the Playoffs.

       

      The Peewee Spring players came together this April and we had no idea how they would do. Well with 8 new additions to the team and with players from our house rec program many doubted our resolve. But the team would not hear of defeat.  With the intense training from coach Frankie and Coach Frank we all set the train in motion. We stressed hockey intelligence and knowing the game. Not just positioning but knowing the game. Coach Frankie really stepped up with the players teaching so much on and off the ice.

       

      This locomotive did not stop until we won the league championship. Boy oh boy was this was an exciting weekend as well.  We swept all 4 teams and clearly were one or 2 steps ahead of everyone. The passing was there, the skating a bit ahead, the breakouts on the dime and power play and penalty kill was like clock work. The boys out shot the completion by an average of 50 shots a game and in one game we unloaded 78 shots.

       

      More than any anything did they have fun. It was all over their faces. The kids had more fun than ever before. So didn’t coach Frank. I had a blast with these guys. It illustrates player development no doubt. They all learned to play and perform so much better. We gave them the room to grow.

       

      I will say I don’t know of any peewee team in the state that could beat us. We played a very balance defense, our back check was relentless and we forced turnovers every time the opposition had the puck with our tenacious fore-check. Our scoring was very balanced and our goaltending very strong

      Way to bring home a championship to the Skatium

       

      Coach Frank

      More News

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

      05/24/2015, 12:00am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

       

      In the heat of a game, it’s easy to lose our cool. Just ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. In the midst of a sweep of the Boston Celtics in the first round of the NBA playoffs, with the series well in hand, J.R. Smith committed a flagrant foul that resulted in his immediate ejection and a two-game suspension. Losing his cool may very well cost his team, as the Cavs are already hampered due to an injury to another starter, Kevin Love.

      Maintaining self-control in the face of challenges, adversity and disappointment is one of the great life lessons that sports can uniquely teach our kids. And while we’d all like to hope that our kids just ‘know what to do’ when the moment presents itself, a little coaching and some clever tips can go a long way toward giving your kids the tools they need to keep their cool in sports and in life.

      So this month, the team at Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive, along with the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance, prepared a six-step approach and companion exercise to help teach your athletes how to keep their cool in frustrating moments.

      Take A Break. 
      When you’re feeling upset and frustrated, sometimes we all just need a quick break to re-center ourselves. Call time-out. Sub out for a play and take a deep breath on the bench.

      Name That Tune. 
      Sometimes it takes recognizing and naming a feeling to then be able to cool down. Encourage kids to notice how their body is feeling to recognize and name the emotions that accompany those feelings, and then to be able to say, “I feel….”. “Is your face red? Are your hands clenched? Are your shoulders tense? Okay – that sounds like you might feel ‘mad’.”

      Count to 10. 
      Having recognized and named an emotion (“mad!”), they can start to recover, maybe counting to ten – “ten Mississippi” if a bit more time is needed – to help the body slow down and give the brain a chance to process and think.

      What Are My Options? 
      Help your athletes take a minute to think through the options for dealing with the emotion. Yell and scream? Kick dirt? Walk away? Tell the other athlete – in nice words – why you are angry? Brush it off and move on to the next play? Help your children think through all of the potential options, and then give them the chance to pick what they think is the best option.

      Try this exercise in practice or at home: write a scenario at the top of the page, “An opposing player just committed a dirty foul on me!” and then split the page into two columns, one labelled Good Options, the other labelled Bad Options. Then have your athletes write down all of the possible actions they could take and place each action under either Good or Bad. (You can do this exercise as a team with players providing answers together and deciding whether each should go under Good or Bad.) Once all the possible choices are listed, circle the best choice and discuss why it is the best. (This page can turn into a poster that may be a great addition to the locker room for the season, reminding kids that there are lots of options but that as a team you’re striving for the best option and the one that maintains self-control and good sportsmanship.)

      Act Out The Best Choice. 
      Step five is to practice acting on the best choice from the Good Options you selected in step 4; don’t just think it in your head. This suggestion may seem more like drama class than sports practice, but act out the best-choice emotion. Think improv: how can you demonstrate and show the emotion if you had no words? It might feel like you’re over the top, but by being overly effusive with emotions in this acting, your athletes cement the ‘best choice’ in their minds, their emotions and their body language.

      Next! 
      Get focused on the next play, the next pitch, the next side change, the next round. Some teams use visual cues like a “brush it off” sign or a “flush it” hand gesture to remind everyone to let it go, reset, refocus and get back into the game.

      Keeping your cool can be tough, especially when the contest isn’t going your way, the fouls aren’t being called, the scoreboard doesn’t reflect your effort, or when a cheap shot disrupts your concentration and flow. But athletes who learn how to stay calm, focused, and ready for what’s next are more likely to stay mentally and physically in the game and give their teams the best chance to win – on and off the field.

      Develop Your Mental Edge Of the Game

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

       

      Key Points In Your Mental Game

      By: Frank Scarpaci 
      Sent to: all access groups (excl. public).

      Encourage Young Athletes to Prepare for the Unexpected 

      Youth Sports Prepare for the Unexpected 
      In sports, there is one given - expect the unexpected.

      As fans, this excitement of not knowing what will happen next is a big reason why we attend, watch and talk about sporting events. For athletes, the unexpected, while thrilling, demands proper preparation to be successful.

      From in-season practices to offseason cross-training, preparation helps our youth athletes build a rock-solid foundation for game-day success. It’s what they do to get ready for competition that often makes the difference when the unexpected happens.

      But how can you help your youth athletes prepare for the unexpected? How can you convince them of the power of preparation?

      Liberty Mutual Insurance, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, offers the following helpful tips and tactics for preparing for the unexpected.

      Envision only success. Encourage them to visualize a stress-free, successful performance – no matter what scenario unfolds. By “practicing” visualization, meditation and other mental training techniques, they’ll give their minds a powerful pre-game “workout.”

      All-out effort. There are many parts of the game they can’t control, but they can control their effort and attitude. Remind them that win or lose, what is more important is whether t they gave 100% effort!

      Keep at it. Tell them the mind is a muscle. Like any muscle, it has to be exercised to grow strong. And like any other part of their game, the more they work their mind, the stronger it gets, making it easier for them to adjust and adapt on the fly.

      Switch it up. Just like your children can “cross-train” by playing multiple sports, they can vary and “change up” their practice routine. They can try practicing with different equipment, or work on using their “off hand”. They can also prepare for different roles, such as a reserve player training to take on a starter’s responsibilities.

      Situational learning. Encourage your kids to practice in different, even difficult, conditions and situations. Practicing in different conditions will help them adapt to a tough game day environment, challenge their normal routine, and demand game-like focus. Activities like simulating crowd noise with a sound system will force them to focus and “zone in” on performing their best.

      With these simple tips from Liberty Mutual Insurance, we hope that your child can always stay prepared for the unexpected.

       

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

       

      Low-Stress Success 
       

      Many parents get their children involved in youth sports so they can have fun. But a good time can quickly turn into a bad one when pressure on youth athletes causes them to feel stress.

      Sometimes the stress comes from the outside when children feel like their parents or coaches expect a win. Other times, pressure can be internal, brought on by the athletes themselves. This can cause fear and anxiety, negatively affecting your child before, during and after competition. 

      Fear of failure is one of the most prevalent stressors in sports. Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ and our partner Positive Coaching Alliance encourage you to remind your child that the game is about more than just winning. Supporting your children and doing all you can to avoid instilling negative thoughts or emotions lets them focus on striving to play well. Using the simple phrases below before a game will help:

      “I love you” “Play hard” “Have fun”

      After some time, stressed athletes can become resentful or decide to quit playing their sport entirely to avoid these negative feelings.

      It’s important for your youth athlete to find ways to de-stress, calm down or “zone in” on their own before, during and after a game. This will help avoid a sense of negative pressure and funnel that energy positively toward their performance. 

      A non-attachment approach is a way youth athletes can learn to perform their best when it matters most. Non-attachment is having the ability to detach yourself from the outcome of a performance and just focus on executing during competition. Youth athletes must learn to define themselves by more than just the results of the game. This can be reinforced after the game when you have the chance to talk to your athletes about their performances.

      Making comments such as: “I love watching you play!” or “You looked like you were having so much fun out there!” will remind your child that the game isn’t all about winning or losing. 

      At home you can help your children relieve some of their stress by making sure they are managing their time well and getting enough rest. Both are key elements in a healthy low-stress lifestyle.

      When children learn to enjoy sports for their own sake, and their goal becomes to do their best rather than trying to be the best, they will find it easier to overcome stress before, during and after the game.

       

      Dear Eels Family and Friends,

       

      Michelle Jumalon’s dad and Steven’s grandfather, Larry Clapp passed away yesterday morning after a tough fight with Cancer. He was an honored veteran who served his country proudly. Many of you helped the family in support and prayer to have him medically transported back to Florida so he could spend his last few days with the family. I can tell you it was most appreciated. The time was so short but the quality and moments they got to spend together in his last days was so special.

       

      Like always the Florida Eels families and friends find it in our hearts to step up to the podium and come through for those in need. Thank you once again for your generosity and fellowship.

       

       We will let you know when the family plans to hold the memorial service.

       

      Please join me in prayer as these are difficult times for Michelle, her mom, her family and especially young Steven. It is never easy to loose a loved one. It is even more difficult to loose a person who was so special, loving and dear to their heart.

       

      Love Coach Frank

      Eels Peewee Spring Team Wins FAHL Title

      05/21/2015, 10:30am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Very Proud Of this team

      Well The Eels Peewees Win The FAHL Spring League Championship Title. Win 4 straight sweeping the Playoffs.

       

      The Peewee Spring players came together this April and we had no idea how they would do. Well with 8 new additions to the team and with players from our house rec program many doubted our resolve. But the team would not hear of defeat.  With the intense training from coach Frankie and Coach Frank we all set the train in motion. We stressed hockey intelligence and knowing the game. Not just positioning but knowing the game. Coach Frankie really stepped up with the players teaching so much on and off the ice.

       

      This locomotive did not stop until we won the league championship. Boy oh boy was this was an exciting weekend as well.  We swept all 4 teams and clearly were one or 2 steps ahead of everyone. The passing was there, the skating a bit ahead, the breakouts on the dime and power play and penalty kill was like clock work. The boys out shot the completion by an average of 50 shots a game and in one game we unloaded 78 shots.

       

      More than any anything did they have fun. It was all over their faces. The kids had more fun than ever before. So didn’t coach Frank. I had a blast with these guys. It illustrates player development no doubt. They all learned to play and perform so much better. We gave them the room to grow.

       

      I will say I don’t know of any peewee team in the state that could beat us. We played a very balance defense, our back check was relentless and we forced turnovers every time the opposition had the puck with our tenacious fore-check. Our scoring was very balanced and our goaltending very strong

      Way to bring home a championship to the Skatium

       

      Coach Frank

      More News

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

      05/24/2015, 12:00am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Six Steps To Keeping Your Cool In A Game

       

      In the heat of a game, it’s easy to lose our cool. Just ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. In the midst of a sweep of the Boston Celtics in the first round of the NBA playoffs, with the series well in hand, J.R. Smith committed a flagrant foul that resulted in his immediate ejection and a two-game suspension. Losing his cool may very well cost his team, as the Cavs are already hampered due to an injury to another starter, Kevin Love.

      Maintaining self-control in the face of challenges, adversity and disappointment is one of the great life lessons that sports can uniquely teach our kids. And while we’d all like to hope that our kids just ‘know what to do’ when the moment presents itself, a little coaching and some clever tips can go a long way toward giving your kids the tools they need to keep their cool in sports and in life.

      So this month, the team at Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive, along with the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance, prepared a six-step approach and companion exercise to help teach your athletes how to keep their cool in frustrating moments.

      Take A Break. 
      When you’re feeling upset and frustrated, sometimes we all just need a quick break to re-center ourselves. Call time-out. Sub out for a play and take a deep breath on the bench.

      Name That Tune. 
      Sometimes it takes recognizing and naming a feeling to then be able to cool down. Encourage kids to notice how their body is feeling to recognize and name the emotions that accompany those feelings, and then to be able to say, “I feel….”. “Is your face red? Are your hands clenched? Are your shoulders tense? Okay – that sounds like you might feel ‘mad’.”

      Count to 10. 
      Having recognized and named an emotion (“mad!”), they can start to recover, maybe counting to ten – “ten Mississippi” if a bit more time is needed – to help the body slow down and give the brain a chance to process and think.

      What Are My Options? 
      Help your athletes take a minute to think through the options for dealing with the emotion. Yell and scream? Kick dirt? Walk away? Tell the other athlete – in nice words – why you are angry? Brush it off and move on to the next play? Help your children think through all of the potential options, and then give them the chance to pick what they think is the best option.

      Try this exercise in practice or at home: write a scenario at the top of the page, “An opposing player just committed a dirty foul on me!” and then split the page into two columns, one labelled Good Options, the other labelled Bad Options. Then have your athletes write down all of the possible actions they could take and place each action under either Good or Bad. (You can do this exercise as a team with players providing answers together and deciding whether each should go under Good or Bad.) Once all the possible choices are listed, circle the best choice and discuss why it is the best. (This page can turn into a poster that may be a great addition to the locker room for the season, reminding kids that there are lots of options but that as a team you’re striving for the best option and the one that maintains self-control and good sportsmanship.)

      Act Out The Best Choice. 
      Step five is to practice acting on the best choice from the Good Options you selected in step 4; don’t just think it in your head. This suggestion may seem more like drama class than sports practice, but act out the best-choice emotion. Think improv: how can you demonstrate and show the emotion if you had no words? It might feel like you’re over the top, but by being overly effusive with emotions in this acting, your athletes cement the ‘best choice’ in their minds, their emotions and their body language.

      Next! 
      Get focused on the next play, the next pitch, the next side change, the next round. Some teams use visual cues like a “brush it off” sign or a “flush it” hand gesture to remind everyone to let it go, reset, refocus and get back into the game.

      Keeping your cool can be tough, especially when the contest isn’t going your way, the fouls aren’t being called, the scoreboard doesn’t reflect your effort, or when a cheap shot disrupts your concentration and flow. But athletes who learn how to stay calm, focused, and ready for what’s next are more likely to stay mentally and physically in the game and give their teams the best chance to win – on and off the field.

      Develop Your Mental Edge Of the Game

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

       

      Key Points In Your Mental Game

      By: Frank Scarpaci 
      Sent to: all access groups (excl. public).

      Encourage Young Athletes to Prepare for the Unexpected 

      Youth Sports Prepare for the Unexpected 
      In sports, there is one given - expect the unexpected.

      As fans, this excitement of not knowing what will happen next is a big reason why we attend, watch and talk about sporting events. For athletes, the unexpected, while thrilling, demands proper preparation to be successful.

      From in-season practices to offseason cross-training, preparation helps our youth athletes build a rock-solid foundation for game-day success. It’s what they do to get ready for competition that often makes the difference when the unexpected happens.

      But how can you help your youth athletes prepare for the unexpected? How can you convince them of the power of preparation?

      Liberty Mutual Insurance, in partnership with Positive Coaching Alliance, offers the following helpful tips and tactics for preparing for the unexpected.

      Envision only success. Encourage them to visualize a stress-free, successful performance – no matter what scenario unfolds. By “practicing” visualization, meditation and other mental training techniques, they’ll give their minds a powerful pre-game “workout.”

      All-out effort. There are many parts of the game they can’t control, but they can control their effort and attitude. Remind them that win or lose, what is more important is whether t they gave 100% effort!

      Keep at it. Tell them the mind is a muscle. Like any muscle, it has to be exercised to grow strong. And like any other part of their game, the more they work their mind, the stronger it gets, making it easier for them to adjust and adapt on the fly.

      Switch it up. Just like your children can “cross-train” by playing multiple sports, they can vary and “change up” their practice routine. They can try practicing with different equipment, or work on using their “off hand”. They can also prepare for different roles, such as a reserve player training to take on a starter’s responsibilities.

      Situational learning. Encourage your kids to practice in different, even difficult, conditions and situations. Practicing in different conditions will help them adapt to a tough game day environment, challenge their normal routine, and demand game-like focus. Activities like simulating crowd noise with a sound system will force them to focus and “zone in” on performing their best.

      With these simple tips from Liberty Mutual Insurance, we hope that your child can always stay prepared for the unexpected.

       

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

      05/23/2015, 11:45pm EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Tips To Maintain Low Stress

       

      Low-Stress Success 
       

      Many parents get their children involved in youth sports so they can have fun. But a good time can quickly turn into a bad one when pressure on youth athletes causes them to feel stress.

      Sometimes the stress comes from the outside when children feel like their parents or coaches expect a win. Other times, pressure can be internal, brought on by the athletes themselves. This can cause fear and anxiety, negatively affecting your child before, during and after competition. 

      Fear of failure is one of the most prevalent stressors in sports. Liberty Mutual Insurance Play Positive™ and our partner Positive Coaching Alliance encourage you to remind your child that the game is about more than just winning. Supporting your children and doing all you can to avoid instilling negative thoughts or emotions lets them focus on striving to play well. Using the simple phrases below before a game will help:

      “I love you” “Play hard” “Have fun”

      After some time, stressed athletes can become resentful or decide to quit playing their sport entirely to avoid these negative feelings.

      It’s important for your youth athlete to find ways to de-stress, calm down or “zone in” on their own before, during and after a game. This will help avoid a sense of negative pressure and funnel that energy positively toward their performance. 

      A non-attachment approach is a way youth athletes can learn to perform their best when it matters most. Non-attachment is having the ability to detach yourself from the outcome of a performance and just focus on executing during competition. Youth athletes must learn to define themselves by more than just the results of the game. This can be reinforced after the game when you have the chance to talk to your athletes about their performances.

      Making comments such as: “I love watching you play!” or “You looked like you were having so much fun out there!” will remind your child that the game isn’t all about winning or losing. 

      At home you can help your children relieve some of their stress by making sure they are managing their time well and getting enough rest. Both are key elements in a healthy low-stress lifestyle.

      When children learn to enjoy sports for their own sake, and their goal becomes to do their best rather than trying to be the best, they will find it easier to overcome stress before, during and after the game.

       

      Dear Eels Family and Friends,

       

      Michelle Jumalon’s dad and Steven’s grandfather, Larry Clapp passed away yesterday morning after a tough fight with Cancer. He was an honored veteran who served his country proudly. Many of you helped the family in support and prayer to have him medically transported back to Florida so he could spend his last few days with the family. I can tell you it was most appreciated. The time was so short but the quality and moments they got to spend together in his last days was so special.

       

      Like always the Florida Eels families and friends find it in our hearts to step up to the podium and come through for those in need. Thank you once again for your generosity and fellowship.

       

       We will let you know when the family plans to hold the memorial service.

       

      Please join me in prayer as these are difficult times for Michelle, her mom, her family and especially young Steven. It is never easy to loose a loved one. It is even more difficult to loose a person who was so special, loving and dear to their heart.

       

      Love Coach Frank

      Eels Peewee Spring Team Wins FAHL Title

      05/21/2015, 10:30am EDT
      By Frank Scarpaci

      Very Proud Of this team

      Well The Eels Peewees Win The FAHL Spring League Championship Title. Win 4 straight sweeping the Playoffs.

       

      The Peewee Spring players came together this April and we had no idea how they would do. Well with 8 new additions to the team and with players from our house rec program many doubted our resolve. But the team would not hear of defeat.  With the intense training from coach Frankie and Coach Frank we all set the train in motion. We stressed hockey intelligence and knowing the game. Not just positioning but knowing the game. Coach Frankie really stepped up with the players teaching so much on and off the ice.

       

      This locomotive did not stop until we won the league championship. Boy oh boy was this was an exciting weekend as well.  We swept all 4 teams and clearly were one or 2 steps ahead of everyone. The passing was there, the skating a bit ahead, the breakouts on the dime and power play and penalty kill was like clock work. The boys out shot the completion by an average of 50 shots a game and in one game we unloaded 78 shots.

       

      More than any anything did they have fun. It was all over their faces. The kids had more fun than ever before. So didn’t coach Frank. I had a blast with these guys. It illustrates player development no doubt. They all learned to play and perform so much better. We gave them the room to grow.

       

      I will say I don’t know of any peewee team in the state that could beat us. We played a very balance defense, our back check was relentless and we forced turnovers every time the opposition had the puck with our tenacious fore-check. Our scoring was very balanced and our goaltending very strong

      Way to bring home a championship to the Skatium

       

      Coach Frank

      Fort Meyers Skatium

      Fort Meyers Skatium (click here for details)

      The Florida Eels The Premier College Placement Program in Junior Hockey

      The Florida Eels Expected to Place An Unprecedented 23 Players Into College for 2015-16

       

      We as Eels are very proud of all of our players who have moved to the Next Level: College. They came here for a reason.

       This week we were excited to report howFLORIDA EELS ALUMNI WINS ANOTHER NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP - ALEX PEPPER GOALIE NYU WINS ACHA DIV 2 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP”

      Alex Pepper is in fact the 3rd player form the Florida Eels who has gone on to attend and play for the prestigious NYU. The other two ironically also were goalies: Jake Widmire and Brian Taptick. No doubt all three boys are outstanding students as academics is a priority in the admissions consideration at NYU.

      NYU is amongst the top academic universities in the Nation. It stands up there with Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Cornell. Academics were the primary factor in the 3 Eel players in deciding where they ultimately would attend college. As often echoed by Coach Frank, the operative word in college hockey is “College”.

      When you graduate from NYU you are amongst the leaders and Elite individuals in society. Our government Leaders, Doctors, Engineers, Chemist, Lawyers’ Bankers and alike come from these colleges.  That is what we all strive for in our children. Of course the boys always aspire to move on and play for the NHL. But that is not the Eels focus. It is to get your child into the best college possible and play hockey while they are there. If an NCAA college is that selection great. But in many instances an ACHA Div. 1 program and sometimes such as NYU a Div. 2 program will trump that decision. Guys’ getting our children to college is truly our goal. That is the true reason why they are here. Please far too many get lost in the alphabet soup. Lets be proud of them. I am. We should encourage and applaud those accomplishments!!!

       We as Eels are very proud of all of our players who have moved to the Next Level: College. They came here for a reason. To fulfill their dreams and I know as GM of this program I am especially proud to have had an impact in moving them on to college.  To see them mature and   become another rich legacy in the Eels success stories..

      Sponsored by KeySport Agency

      KeySport Agency

      Visit Website

      Let The Tradition Continue Will Your Child Be Part Of It?

      Mid Day Bantam and Midget Training

      03/02/2015, 8:30pm EST
       
      By Frank Scarpaci

      3 Lifetime Views · 0 Views in Last 2 days

      The Florida Eels Return its Roots In Offering High Level Week Day Training For Bantam and Midget Players. We would love to see your child join the ranks of these success stories.

       

      Here is a partial list of players who trained like this

       

      In the past the Eels offered mid day training to its bantam and midget players. Sure it is not for all but for those that found a way to make it happen it had significant impact on their hockey careers

       

       Mario Puskarich played Bantams for the Florida Eels, U16 Tier I for the Eels, Captain of the Florida Eels Junior team, NAHL, USHL Tier I USA Leading scorer BCHL Tier II Canada and college player of the year for NCAA University of Vermont.

       

      Cam Darcy played Bantam and midget for the Florida Eels. Played juniors for Florida Eels. NCAA Div. 1 Northeastern Univ. and Canadian Major Junior QMJHL Drafted by the NHL Tampa Bay Lighting

       

      RJ Boyd played Peewee Bantam Midget and Juniors Florida Eels Played Cushing Academy Prep USHL and drafted NHL Florida Panthers and currently plays for NCAA Men’s Michigan State Univ.

       

      Sammy Boyd Played Florida Eels Squirt Peewee Bantam Midget and Juniors Currently Plays NCAA Div. 3 U Mass Boston

       

      Richey Boyd Played Mite squirt peewee bantam midget and Juniors Florida Eels Cushing Academy drafted USHL Omaha Lancers Currently plays NCAA Div. 1 UNH.

       

      Chris Weiland Played Midget Florida Eels and then Castleton NCAA Div. 3 and SUNY Plattsburgh Div. 3

       

      Mike Cifelli Played Midget U16 Eels Texas Tornadoes NAHL and then NCAA Div. 3. Castleton State

       

      Teddy Ruth Played Bantam and Midget Florida Eels drafted NHL Washington Capitals and played NCAA Notre Dame.

       

      Clay Witt Played Bantam Florida Eels NCAA Then USHL and now starting goalie NCAA Div. 1 Northeastern Univ.

       

      David Limoges Bantam, Midget and Juniors Florida Eels Now NCAA Div. 3 Skidmore College.

       

      Kevin Murdock Played Peewee Bantam and Midget Florida Eels NCAA men’s Lake Superior

       

      Michia Williams Played Bantams Midget Florida Eels NCAA Div. 1 men’s college hockey Bentley College

       

      December 5th at noontime and December 7th at 8:00 am Rochester Junior Americans Face Off Against the Eels Empire Team at the Fort Myers Skatium


      Unity Will Prevail

      In a little over a week the Florida Eels Empire team will play host to the Rochester Junior Americans at the Fort Myers Skatium. This is an unprecedented event as Rochester being one of the top programs in the USPHL will be traveling to Southwest Florida to play the Florida Eels at home for two games vs. the Eels Empire team and two games vs. the Florida Jr. Blades.

       

      This is pretty special for the Eels as they and the Blades are the only two teams Rochester will be playing during their Florida debut. The Junior Americans are a very solid organization.  Last season, Rochester’s Elite team performed so exceptionally well they were elevated to a Premier team. This season, Rochester does not have an Elite team so their Empire team is their second level. These are high-end players who are pushing the envelope to play on their Premier team.

       

       The Junior Americans Empire team has some very talented players. For example, #28 Brenda McFall is their leading scorer. In 17 games he has 20 goals and 24 assist for 44 points. McFall is 4th in the entire Empire league in scoring. With him is # 93 William Shaffer is another sniper. In only 15 games he has 17 goals and 25 assist for 42 points. Shaffer is 6th overall in the Empire league in scoring. Then there is #71 Said Khamidov who in 18 games enjoys 17 goals 21 assist for 38 points.   Connor Rotenberg is an ever-present threat where he has in 17 games 7 goals and 10 assist for 17 points.

      On the Blueline they have one of the league’s top defenseman # 11 who is a playmaker where he boast 5 goals with 17 assist.

      These two matches are not exhibition or scrimmage games. They are regularly scheduled league games. Coach Frankie and his squad are not taking these two games lightly. They have a game plan and intend very much to execute on it. The Eels Empire team did quite well against the Northern teams at the IHC November Showcase. They went 2-1 in their contest and felt very comfortable. Even in their only loss it was against the New York Aviators who are the number one ranked Northern Empire team. In that match we only lost by 2-0 score. That team has defeated most opponents by double digits.

      Moreover, the Empire team has made a few changes in the past few weeks and they are really staring to come together. All of our guys are dialed in. Defense wins games and we need secondary scoring from the 3rd and 4th lines. Goaltending has been solid so the Eels are intending to win these two key games.

      In January another top Northern Team is making its way to Florida to play the Eels Empire team. The Syracuse Stars. Again these are great games for our boys who do not have to travel to the north to engage in these high level games.

       

       

       

       

      Being A Positive Sports Parent

      It is important to be supportive and respectful, not only of your child, but also of the others on the team and of the coaches. As a parent, you have the power to help shape your youth athlete’s attitude about sports.

      It’s natural to get excited when watching your child play but it is important to keep your emotions in check on game day. Here are some tips to help you:

      1. Be supportive before the competition even starts. Tell your youth athlete you are proud, regardless of how well he/she plays.
      2. Remind them that it’s normal to be nervous and to have fun even when playing hard.
      3. Let the coaches coach; avoid instructing your child or other players from the sidelines.
      4. Cheer for good plays and great efforts by both teams.
      5. When the game ends, set a good example for your child by thanking the officials, coaches, teammates and opposing teams for their efforts.

      After following these guidelines, go ahead and give yourself a pat on the back! And know that your support role doesn't end there.

      Consider these three tips when talking with your children after they compete:

      • Talk only when your child is ready. If your youth athlete wants to talk about the game, he/she will bring it up, maybe even on the ride home. If it seems like he/she doesn't feel like talking, respect that. Pushing your child to discuss a game, play-by-play, especially if he/she did not perform well, may turn them off sports and decrease his/her desire to share his/her thoughts with you or ask your opinion.
      • Ask open-ended questions. Once the conversation begins, keep it going by asking questions your child can't answer with a simple "yes" or "no." For example, ask, “What did you think was your team’s best play of the game?” and "How did you feel about the close call at first base?"
      • Listen carefully. If you're experienced in the sport your child plays, it might be tempting to jump in and share your own stories as they are telling theirs. Be patient; make a conscious effort to listen to what they have to say about their experience. Let your youth athlete take control of the conversation, help them process their thoughts and emotions, and then determine whether or not there's a life lesson you can impart.

      Be positive. Remind your child that you are proud of them, especially when the outcome doesn't go their way.

      When you support your child before and during a game, and communicate with them effectively after the game, they will not only have a strong mental attitude, but they will also be more coachable, optimistic, and better able to handle the inevitable losses that are part of the youth sports experience.


       

      College Tour


      Off to College

      This week we announced the plans for our College Tour while in Boston

      We will leave Ft Myers Florida by bus Wed Jan 7th & arrive Thursday in Marlboro Ma Jan 8th 2015
      That evening we will all get a quick dinner and off to watch a NCAA College hockey game. Game TBA.

      Jan 9th Friday morning quite early approx. 7 am we will depart by bus as a program and visit 2-3 colleges. Schools TBA

      Friday evening we will go and attend a NCAA College game.

      This will give each player a chance to visit 2-3 schools and watch 2 games = 4 teams.

      Jan 10th Saturday morning the Empire team (Optional for Elite players as the have an evening game) another visit to another college. 

      Jan 11 Sunday no college visits Elite and Empire teams both have 2 games each.

      Jan 12th Monday no college visits each team has 1 game 

      Jan 12th The Eels will leave to return to Florida after games.

      *
      Note 1994 Eels Elite and Empire players along with a select number of 1995 players are being offered the chance to remain with coach Frank and Bloomingburg to attend schools Tuesday Wed and Thursday. We will target approx. 6 colleges for tour.

      This second phase is not part of the regular Eels program. The players will need to make plane reservations back home late on Thursday Jan 15th.
      We will suggest the flight to take. 
      Players will have to pay for own hotel rooms 4 per room approx. $50 per night
      Players need to share cost of vans and gas $150 for the period.
      Pay for their own food Hopefully hotels will have breakfast
      Pro-rata share of Coach Bloomingburg’s plane ticket $25.

      Please note that this trip is extremely popular and very worthwhile for the players who are planning on attending college in the fall of 2015. Players get to kick the tires if you will.  They get to see the schools, dorms etc. However, it makes s no sense for players to go who are not destined and targeted to attend college next fall. You have time and it would not be a wise allocation of funds. This is not a field trip. You will be also missing valuable practice time back in Florida.

      Also, we fully understand and appreciate that funds are limited with all players and families. If you cannot afford to do this additional college tour do not panic. We can do the virtual tours on the web of collegs that many of the college web sites have. But there is no doubt this has enormous upside.

      Players need to get their college letters in as I instructed. They need to have written to admissions offices. Letters t o coaches and gone to the college web sites and filled out recruiting profiles. They should have their high school transcripts sent to the colleges even if it is unofficial. They should have obtained 3 letters of recommendation. They help enormously. For schools they have a definite desire to attend they need and should fill out their college applications. Also by now you all should have compiled a DVD of 12 + clips 15 seconds each segment. This should be of goals or assist for forwards and defenseman. You should also show good plays back check fore-check, solid hits. For goalies save saves etc.


      If parents and players have any questions please fell free to call me. I am available Friday Dec 5th 5 pm - - 9 pm
      Saturday Dec 6th 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
      Sunday Dec 7th noon -7pm

      I need a definite answer no later than Sunday evening 9:00 pm
      Look forward to hearing from you

      Thanks 
      Frank Scarpaci
      Florida Eels GM 
      941-400-9023

      Florida Eels Junior Website

      For a more info on the Florida Eels USPHL Elite and Empire teams go to the above web site

      Peewees Bantams and U16 Midgets Gear Up For Christmas Tournament

      The kids are so excited about the up coming games..........

      Florida Eels Juniors Had 6 Teams & 120 Players Showcased at These Venues


      No Doubt Eels Players Get Recruited

       

       

      Chowder Cup Scouts  
      Marty Abrams Wellington Dukes (OJHL)
      Mike Addessa Calgary Flames (NHL)
      Peter Alden CT. Wolf Pack (EHL)
      Tony Amonte Thayer (Prep)
      Dan Armstrong Brockville Braves (CCHA)
      Craig Badger The Gunnery (Prep)
      Ryan Bailey Canterbury (Prep)
      Robbie Barker Lawrence Academy (Prep)
      Ben Barr Western Michigan (NCAA D1)
      Joe Beal Sacred Heart (NCAA D1)
      David Berard Holy Cross (NCAA D1)
      Rick Bennett Union (NCAA D1)
      Paul Billing Windsor Spitfires (OHL)
      Todd Bracket Vancouver Canucks (NHL)
      Vinny Bohr Topeka Capitals (NAHL)
      David Borgess Stonehill College (NCAA D3)
      Dean Boylan Phillips Andover Academy (Prep)
      John Burgess Suffolk University (NCAA D3)
      Mathieu Castonguay Northwood School
      Jason Cerenzia St. Georges (Prep)
      TJ Clarke Kingston Voyageurs (OJHL)
      Larry Cockrell Governor's Academy (Prep)
      Carl Corrazzini St. Marks (Prep)
      Cliff Cook NY Aviators (USPHL)
      Brendan Collins USHR
      Matt Curley Bentley (NCAA D1)
      Bob Crocker Los Angeles Kings (NHL)
      Mike Cusack Dubuque Fighting Saints (USHL)
      Derek Cunha Williston Northhampton School (Prep)
      David Cunniff Worchester Shark (AHL)
      Kevin Cunningham Connecticut College (NCAA D3)
      Al Cusson Charlottetown Islanders (QMJHL)
      Tony Dalessio NH Jr. Monarchs (EHL)
      John Dean North York Rangers (OJHL)
      Rich Decaprio Bosotn Jr. Rangers (EHL)
      Pat Desir Moses Brown
      Scott Drevitch Boston Bandits (EHL)
      Dan Driscoll Berkshire School (Prep)
      Tad Doherty Becker College (NCAA D3)
      Jerry Domish Philadelphia Jr. Flyers (EHL)
      Craig Doremus New York Bobcats (EHL)
      Rick Dorual Hawsbury Hawks (CCHA)
      Ted Donato Harvard (NCAA D1)
      Nate Dudley Babson (NCAA D3)
      Keith Dupee Lawrenceville (Prep)
      Jerome Dupont Trenton Golden Hawks (OJHL)
      Cam Ellsworth Umass Lowell (NCAA D1)
      Scott Frank Cape Cod Islanders
      Doug Friedman Kents Hill School (Prep)
      Jason Fortier Toronto Lakeshore Patriots (OJHL)
      Brain Gallagher Philadelphia Jr. Flyers (EHL)
      John Gardner Avon Od Farms (Prep)
      Mathew Greason  Trinity College (NCAA D3)
      Matt Goethels Pomfret (Prep)
      Peter Goulet Napean Raiders (CCHA)
      Guu Girourd  CIH Academy
      Steve Greely Boston University (NCAA D1)
      Rich Guberti Fordham University
      Jason Guerriero Yale (NCAA D1)
      Ben Guite Maine (NCAA D1)
      Rob Haberbusch Hamilton College (NCAA D3)
      Chris Hall Colby College (NCAA D3)
      Ryan Hardy USNTDP
      Josh Hand Manhattanville College (NCAA D3)
      Michael Haviland Colorado College (NCAA D1)
      Andy Heinze Valley Jr. Warriors (EHL)
      Ian Henderson  Hawksbury Hawks (CCHL)
      Steve Hoar Becker College (NCAA D3)
      Rob Hutchinson Trinity-Pawling School (Prep)
      Steve Jacobs NE Wolves (EHL)
      Paul Jennings Gloucester Rangers (CCHL)
      Dan Jewell Hamilton College (NCAA D3)
      Matt Johnson Tri City Storm (USHL)
      Kiernan Joyce Sherbrook Phoenix (QMJHL)
      Matt Keating Tufts (NCAA D3)
      Jerry Keefe Northeastern University (NCAA D1)
      Casey Keselring New Hampton School (Prep)
      Paul Kirtland  Fairbanks Ice Dogs (NAHL)
      Tom Kowal WBS Knights (EHL)
      Eric Lang Army (NCAA D1)
      Trevor Large Canisius College (NCAA D1)
      Jay Leach Maine (NCAA D1)
      Nate Leaman Providence College (NCAA D1)
      Chris Line Vermont Lumberjacks (EHL)
      Mark Lotito NJ Avalanche
      Bob Luccini Carolina Panthers (NHL)
      Chris Locker Shattucks St. Mary's
      Jon Lounsbury  Walpole Express (EHL)
      RC Lyke Richmond Generals (USPHL)
      Jon Kirk National Sports Academy
      David MacDonald Advisor
      Ian Macinnis Cornwall Colts (CCHL)
      Jim Madigan Northeastern University (NCAA D1)
      Bill Maniscalco Avon Old Farms (Prep)
      CJ Marottolo Sacred Heart (NCAA D1)
      Geoff Marottolo Advisor
      Kris Mayotte Providence College (NCAA D1)
      Eric McCambly Daniel Webster College
      Dave McCauley Bay State Breakers (USPHL)
      Jon McCourt Endicott College (NCAA D3)
      Scott McDougal Sacred Heart (NCAA D1)
      Ed McGolgan Washington Capitals (NHL)
      Will McNally Gatineau Olympiques (QMJHL)
      Bob Miele Westfield State (NCAA D3)
      Steve Miller Providence College (NCAA D1)
      Paul Merritt Buffalo Sabers (NHL)
      Jon Morin Phillips Andover Academy (Prep)
      Vincent Montalbano St. Louis Blues (NHL)
      Fred Myers  East Coast Wizards (EHL)
      Steve Needham Wesleyan University (NCAA D3)
      Frank O'Connor Northern Cyclones (EHL)
      Chris O'Donnell Salmon Arm (BCHL)
      Dave O'Donnel South Shore Kings (USPHL)
      Bill O'Neill Salem State College (NCAA D3)
      Greg Osborne  Pomfret (Prep)
      Devin Payne Brockville Braves (CCHA)
      Juliano Pagliero Holy Cross (NCAA D1)
      Jon Park  WBS Knights (EHL)
      Brian Parriso Casper Coyotes (WSHL)
      Dave Peers  Jr. Wolfpack (EHL)
      Brett Provost South Kent  (Prep)
      Derek Richards Olympia Sports Management
      David Quinn Boston University (NCAA D1)
      Brett Riley Charlottetown Islanders
      Rob Riley Columbue Blue Jackets (NHL)
      Cam Robichaud NH Jr. Monarch (EHL)
      Frank Robinson Saginaw Spirit (OHL)
      Rocky Romanella University of Delaware
      Larry Rocha St. Anselm (NCAA D3)
      Peter Roundy Trinity College (NCAA D3)
      Lou Santini NY Applecore (EHL)
      Patrick Schafer Providence Capitals (USPHL)
      Gary Shuchuk University Of Wisconsin (NCAA D1)
      Rod Simmons NH Fighting Spirit
      Dave Spinale Xavarian (Catholic)
      Todd Sterling Boston Bandits (EHL)
      Jean St. Pierre McGill University
      Jon Sokolski Millbrook School (Prep)
      Vincent Soriento Millbrook School (Prep)
      Mike Souza Uconn (NCAA D1)
      Bob Thorton New Jersey Rockets (EHL)
      Brain Troy Winchendon School
      Jim Troy MSS Sports
      Ron Tugnutt Kemptville 73's (CCHL)
      Brain Umansky Islanders HC (USPHL)
      Nick Unger National Sports Academy
      Mike Warde Bridgton Academy
      William Weiand Northern Cyclones (EHL)
      Steve Wiedler Curry College (NCAA D3)
      Brendan Whittet Brown University (NCAA D1)
      Mark Yates Central Scouting (NHL)/ Halifax (QMJHL)
      Brain Young  Oswego State (NCAA D3)